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20121210
20121210
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is unacceptable. the people's republic of china, which is not exactly a beacon of hope for those looking for religious liberty. we all know the situation in tibet which is not just a religious issue, it's an ethnic issue, a cultural issue. we see the self-emolation of folks willing to burn alive because it's so intolerable what they're going through and the effort of that government to wipe out their identity. but it goes much deeper than that. proselytizing governments, nonpatriotic catholics. understand that the chinese government authorizes the catholic church, who the leadership of that church can be. truly unique in all the world you have a government that tells you who your bishops are, who tells you who gets to run your church. if you worship outside of that setting, you're persecuted. there are others, the tibetan beautists i mentioned before but -- buddhists that i talked before. but it's not just religious believers who are facing persecution in china. this is from the report, the chinese government continues to harass, detain, intimidate, disbar and forcibly disappear, forcibl
in essence would serve as sanctions on iran but the point is that china needs to be pressured to stop the loophole in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from the centrifuge program, and that effort overtime has had tremendous success, and with more and more sanctions it has been more successful. more purchase is stopped, more interdictions and more trouble for iran to make progress on the gas centrifuge program. >> in terms of the nonproliferation program, and david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist particularly in the export controls and the lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation what is your assessment of the u.s. nonproliferation program or what can be done and should be done? >> when you hear the sanctions, those are all the things we try to do. and so, there are four things that can be done to force things to have better training in the region if you will, but we also need to look at the demand side as well. what drives the countries to proliferate and then how do you also built in that notion of a non-proliferation, how do you
the russian point of view was that gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. and with 100 inf missiles directed at him, how was he going to do that? it's really not in their interest to have 100 missiles out of europe. and it was really in their interest. now, we now have access, have for some years, records of the polit bureau discussions. and let me go back to a couple words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev, he wrote out on a yellow pad several pages, without any prompting from anybody, what he wanted to achieve in geneva in his first meeting. this was handed literally to me as we are getting off the plane in geneva, saying this is what the president has on his mind. if he is wrong somewhere, we will have to straighten him out. actually, it was a very, very precise paper. and among other things, he pointed out that our biggest problems, one of these was a lack of trust. that he had to find a way to begin to create trust. we're not going to solve anything else. he also had it, if i don't achieve anything else, i must convince gorbachev t
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3